First Growth Bordeaux

15 Oct First Growth Bordeaux

mouton rothschildWe have three of the highest scoring first growths ever made on sale. Considering quality, history, production levels, longevity, and reputation, the five first growths of Bordeaux’s left bank are the greatest wines in the world, bar none. Chateau Margaux dates back to the 1500s, and the quality of the wines has never wavered. The best vintages can age over 50 years, and their names are synonymous with greatness.

2009 and 2010 are the highest rated vintages for Pauillac from The Wine Advocate, 98 and 99 points respectively.

Available by the bottle, or by the case in original wood cases.

2009 Chateau Mouton-Rothschild, Pauillac 
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The 2009 Mouton-Rothschild is as concentrated as the 2010, but it presents itself in a more consumer-friendly, seductive style. Opulently textured and full-bodied with gorgeous levels of crème de cassis, melted licorice, espresso roast and chocolate, it possesses high but sweet, velvety tannins, massive body, and fabulous purity as well as length. This could turn out to be a candidate for perfection in another 8-10 years. It will drink well for 30-50 years, but will always be much more approachable and charming than its 2010 counterpart.
99 Points, The Wine Advocate
(only the 1982 and 1986 received a higher Wine Advocate score since 1961)

2010 Chateau Mouton-Rothschild, Pauillac
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This strides in with distinction, starting off with a showy but integrated layer of espresso-infused toast, followed by plush tiers of crushed currant, plum and blackberry fruit interspersed with cocoa and well-roasted cedar notes. The long, tobacco- and loam-filled finish shows lots of heft, but stays polished. An impressive display of unadulterated, muscular Cabernet Sauvignon. Best from 2020 through 2045.
98 Points, Wine Spectator
97+ Points, The Wine Advocate

2009 Chateau Margaux, Margaux 
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A brilliant offering from the Mentzelopoulos family, once again their gifted manager, Paul Pontallier, has produced an uncommonly concentrated, powerful 2009 Chateau Margaux made from 87% Cabernet Sauvignon and the rest primarily Merlot with small amounts of Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot. As with most Medocs, the alcohol here is actually lower (a modest 13.3%) than most of its siblings-. Abundant blueberry, cassis and acacia flower as well as hints of charcoal and forest floor aromas that are almost Burgundian in their complexity are followed by a wine displaying sweet, well-integrated tannins as well as a certain ethereal lightness despite the wine’s overall size. Rich, round, generous and unusually approachable for such a young Margaux, this 2009 should drink well for 30-35+ years.
99 Points, The Wine Advocate
(only the 2000 and 1990 received a higher Wine Advocate score since 1953)

2010 Chateau Margaux, Margaux 
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The 2010 is a brilliant Chateau Margaux, as one might expect in this vintage. The percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon in the final blend hit 90%, the balance Merlot and Cabernet Franc, and only 38% of the crop made it into the Chateau Margaux. Paul Pontallier, the administrator, told me that this wine has even higher levels of tannin than some other extraordinary vintages such as 2005, 2000, 1996, etc. Deep purple, pure and intense, with floral notes, tremendous opulence and palate presence, this is a wine of considerable nobility. With loads of blueberry, black currant and violet-infused fruit and a heady alcohol level above 13.5% (although that looks modest compared to several other first growths, particularly Chateau Latour and Chateau Haut-Brion), its beautifully sweet texture, ripe tannin, abundant depth and profound finish all make for another near-perfect wine that should age effortlessly for 30-40 years.
99 Points, The Wine Advocate
(only the 2000 and 1990 received a higher Wine Advocate score since 1953)

Also on sale from Bordeaux

2010 Chateau Lafleur, Pomerol 
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Bright ruby. Captivating nose combines blackcurrant, blackberry syrup, vanilla, minerals, dried rose, violet and white pepper; the cabernet franc element (roughly 54% of the blend) really comes through. Sweet and pliant on entry, then more austere in the middle, with penetrating but youthfully reticent flavors of dark berries, minerals, coffee reduction, cocoa and tobacco leaf. With its rather silky texture, good breadth and restrained sweetness, this 2010 offers considerable early appeal but has the structure to last several decades. Finishes subtle and gripping, with a rising, palate-dusting finish featuring notes of smoke, herbs and flowers. This stellar wine will go down in memory not just as one of the greatest Lafleurs in memory, but of all Bordeaux. For me, it’s also the wine of the vintage right now.
97+ Points, Vinous Media
96+ Points, The Wine Advocate